Over Training

http://www.rockandice.com/climbing-news/jonathan-siegrist-interview-three-5-15s-in-three-weeks

I just read this release from Rock and Ice and am happy to hear what J-Star shared. I know that you all know that I train for climbing, but its not that much and it is very concentrated, short and focused. It may sound like I train everyday, but I only get to train for real, 90 minutes a week.

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Pro climbers, who have a home base (especially competition climbers) spend hours everyday in the climbing gym doing all sorts of things to progress. It can and will lead to progress, but there are sometimes more negatives achieved than positives. Lack of focus, lack of motivation, injuries, over training symptoms all over your body and the feeling that you are bound lock and key to a program are just a few.

J-Star mentioned over training. I went through that once and only once about 15 years ago. It was when I wanted to reach my personal potential and actually started to “train”.

The reason why I over trained was simple. I didn’t believe that the training would actually work. So, I completed all that was required of my program (that was well written by a very knowledgeable friend and coach) and then did more that I came up with. The result, improvements at the beginning and then a flat line to a decrease in everything. After I got that out of my system by failing on my trip and route that I was training for, I bought into the less is more. That is when I really began to progress.

I have worked with many athletes who had never trained before. Some listened to my story, because I share it with everyone that I end up training and others didn’t. Those that did listen, didn’t try to climb and do more after their workout was over and peaked and climbed their best. Those that thought that they needed more, got more tired and ended up under performing and being upset.

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Then you have the group that don’t listen to their body when they train. When your body says rest, you rest and when it says push, you push and when you are questioning where you are at, you error on the side of doing a little less. It is that simple.

So what’s my point? Train when you need to in short bursts with very specific and measurable goals.

 

One thought on “Over Training

  1. Pingback: This Week in Climbing #61 (April 30, 2017) - The Undercling

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